Science News

Scientists used the fossil record of T. rex and the principles of population ecology to estimate dinosaur demographics and the chances of finding an extinct animal in the fossil record. Read more.


Our collections registrar and entomology collections manager recently returned to The Nat after a nine-year hiatus and spent time exploring our extensive collection of marine invertebrates. Learn about what she discovered—or rediscovered—and how we are working to make the collection more accessible to other scientists and the public.   Read more.


La construcción del muro fronterizo ha afectado las especies de la región, pero ¿qué tipo de impacto? Necesitamos tiempo y datos para comprenderlo. Ahí es donde entran en juego el BioBlitz de la frontera e investigadores como la Dra. Sula Vanderplank.  Read more.


Construction of the border wall has impacted species in the region—but what kind of impact? We need time and data to figure it out. That’s where the Border BioBlitz and researchers like Dr. Sula Vanderplank come in. Read more.


Calling all birders and community scientists! Between now and the end of July, we need your help observing nesting raptors in and around the Batiquitos Lagoon Ecological Reserve. This is a great opportunity to observe wildlife while helping scientists with important research and conservation work.  Read more.


From across a crowded pond...male frog calls give female frogs information about a potential mate. We’re continuing to study the California Red-legged Frog with the help of acoustic monitors that record their calls. Read more.


Climate change poses a serious threat to life in and around San Diego. Headline-grabbing natural disasters are obvious, but there are other more subtle—yet alarming—ways a warming climate is affecting wildlife in our region. Read more.


A recent court ruling blocked the proposed listing of four species of extremely rare bumblebees from being protected under the California Endangered Species Act. We have a few things to say about that. Read more.


Winter finally brings “sweater weather”—even though one might need to shed their layers by noon once the day heats up. The temperature changes also bring about changes in our regional wildlife. Learn more about the natural phenomena that occur each winter. Read more.


The monarch butterfly is in severe decline. Recent studies show the Western Monarch population, which overwinters here in southern California, has decreased by 99% with less than 30,000 butterflies remaining. With such critically low numbers, now is the time to take action. Read on to learn how to support monarch butterflies right now. Read more.