Science News

Since starting last September, Library Director Arie Hammond has been asked about everything, from black widow spiders to dead whales to prehistoric flowers. She shares some of her favorite unusual questions, and the answers her research revealed.  Read more.


Our first cohort of STEM apprentices reflect on their time with The Nat’s research department, sharing how they got here, what they learned, and where they’re going next.  Read more.


Natural history collections do much more than document our biological diversity. They are also key to unlocking future discoveries and contributing to major advances in the fields of medicine, human health, and even agriculture.  Read more.


For homeowners, being fire safe usually means pruning trees and bushes around dwellings. But this brings with it the potential to disturb bird nests during the height of breeding season. Learn how to remain fire safe while minimizing the impact on our feathered friends.   Read more.


Just how do you find out how many of these dinosaurs lived on our planet? Scientists used the fossil record of T. rex and the principles of population ecology to estimate dinosaur demographics and the chances of finding an extinct animal in the fossil record. Read more.


Our collections registrar and entomology collections manager recently returned to The Nat after a nine-year hiatus and spent time exploring our extensive collection of marine invertebrates. Learn about what she discovered—or rediscovered—and how we are working to make the collection more accessible to other scientists and the public.   Read more.


La construcción del muro fronterizo ha afectado las especies de la región, pero ¿qué tipo de impacto? Necesitamos tiempo y datos para comprenderlo. Ahí es donde entran en juego el BioBlitz de la frontera e investigadores como la Dra. Sula Vanderplank.  Read more.


Construction of the border wall has impacted species in the region—but what kind of impact? We need time and data to figure it out. That’s where the Border BioBlitz and researchers like Dr. Sula Vanderplank come in. Read more.


Calling all birders and community scientists! Between now and the end of July, we need your help observing nesting raptors in and around the Batiquitos Lagoon Ecological Reserve. This is a great opportunity to observe wildlife while helping scientists with important research and conservation work.  Read more.


From across a crowded pond...male frog calls give female frogs information about a potential mate. We’re continuing to study the California Red-legged Frog with the help of acoustic monitors that record their calls. Read more.