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Species Tables

Responses of Birds to the Cedar Fire in Cleveland National Forest
Winter 2005–06 to Winter 2006–07

Trend within burned area No preference
for burned or unburned
Prefers burned Prefers unburned Preference unclear
Decreasing Hermit Thrush Cedar Waxwing
Rock Wren
House Wren
Lincoln’s Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Ruby-crowned Kinglet Chipping Sparrow
Lark Sparrow
Increasing Dark-eyed Junco Western Bluebird
Mountain Bluebird
House Wren
American Robin
Lesser Goldfinch
Western Scrub Jay
Wrentit
Band-tailed Pigeon
Flat Red-tailed Hawk
Northern Flicker
American Crow
Common Raven
Bewick’s Wren
Yellow-rumped Warbler
White-throated Swift
Loggerhead Shrike
House Finch
Rufous-crowned Sparrow
California Towhee
Nuttall’s Woodpecker
California Thrasher
Oak Titmouse
Fox Sparrow
Spotted Towhee
[many species whose numbers were too few for analysis]
Absent

Mountain Quail
Hutton’s Vireo
Bushtit

Not bold: Species whose pattern of change along the burned routes did not differ significantly from their pattern along the unburned route. Though these species may have responded positively (column 2) or negatively (column 3) to the fire, their variations since the fire have not been affected clearly by postfire succession.

Bold: Species whose pattern of change along the burned routes differed significantly from their pattern along the unburned route. Though these species may be about equally abundant in burned and unburned areas (column 1), their variations since the fire have been affected clearly by postfire succession.

Bold italic: Species whose pattern of change along the burned routes differed significantly from their pattern along the unburned routes because they were absent along the unburned routes or their numbers along the unburned routes were so low no comparison could be made.

Responses of Birds to the Cedar Fire in Cleveland National Forest in the Breeding Season, April 2005–July 2007

Trend within burned area No preference
for burned or unburned
Prefers burned Prefers unburned Preference unclear
Decreased 2005–>2007 Lawrence’s Goldfinch Costa’s Hummingbird
Rock Wren
Lazuli Bunting
Bullock’s Oriole
Anna’s Hummingbird 
Scrub Jay
Black-headed Grosbeak
Blue Grosbeak
Increased 2005–>2007 Common Raven
Cliff Swallow
Sage Sparrow
Phainopepla 
Lesser Goldfinch
House Finch
Rufous-crowned Sparrow
California Towhee
Bewick’s Wren
Wrentit
Orange-crowned Warbler
Turkey Vulture
Peaking
Western Bluebird
Red-winged Blackbird
Spotted Towhee Acorn Woodpecker
Dipping White-throated Swift Violet-green Swallow

Flat California Quail
Mourning Dove
Western Wood Pewee
Ash-throated Flycatcher
House Wren
Wilson’s Warbler
Brown-headed Cowbird
Red-tailed Hawk
Western Kingbird
Black-chinned Sparrow
Lark Sparrow
Mountain Quail
Northern Flicker
American Crow
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
American Kestrel
Too few to say White-breasted Nuthatch
Cooper’s Hawk
Nuttall’s Woodpecker
California Thrasher
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Townsend’s Warbler

Absent

Hutton’s Vireo

Bold: Pattern of change in burned area significantly different from that in unburned.

Not bold: Pattern of change in burned area not significantly different from that in unburned.

Italic: Too few in either burned or unburned for patterns of change to be compared.

Responses of Birds in Cuyamaca Rancho State Park to the Cedar Fire in winter, December 2004–February 2007

Trend on Cuyamaca No preference
for burned or unburned
Prefers burned Prefers unburned Preference unclear
Increasing Red-tailed Hawk
Western Bluebird
American Robin
Bushtit
Wrentit
Purple Finch
Mountain Quail
California Quail
Hairy Woodpecker
House Finch
Fox Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
California Towhee
Red-shouldered Hawk
Acorn Woodpecker
Nuttall’s Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Song Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Decreasing
Rock Wren
American Crow

Peaking Hermit Thrush
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Wild Turkey
Mourning Dove
Bewick’s Wren

House Wren
Lawrence’s Goldfinch
Lincoln’s Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
White-breasted Nuthatch
Mountain Chickadee

Lesser Goldfinch
Spotted Towhee

Dipping

Band-tailed Pigeon
No Trend
Common Raven Steller’s Jay
W. Scrub Jay
Brown Creeper
Pygmy Nuthatch

Too few on Cuyamaca for trend to be assessed

Pine Siskin
Townsend’s Warbler

Absent

Varied Thrush
Golden-crowned Kinglet

Not bold: Species whose pattern of change in Cuyamaca (burned) did not differ significantly from their pattern on Palomar (unburned). Though these species may have responded positively (column 2) or negatively (column 3) to the fire, their variations since the fire have not been affected clearly by postfire succession.

Bold: Species whose pattern of change along in Cuyamaca (burned) differed significantly from their pattern on Palomar (unburned). Though these species may be about equally abundant in burned and unburned areas (column 1), their variations since the fire have been affected clearly by postfire succession.

Bold italic: Species whose pattern of change along the burned routes differed significantly from their pattern along the unburned routes because they were absent along the unburned routes or their numbers along the unburned routes were so low no comparison could be made.

Postfire Response of Birds in Cuyamaca Rancho State Park to the Cedar Fire in the breeding season, April 2004–July 2007

Trend on Cuyamaca No preference Prefers burned Prefers unburned
Increasing Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Hairy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker 
Western Bluebird
Violet-green Swallow
Mountain Quail
California Quail
Western Kingbird
Phainopepla

Bewick’s Wren
House Finch
Chipping Sparrow
Black-chinned Sparrow
Sage Sparrow
California Towhee

Lazuli Bunting
Brewer’s Blackbird
Nuttall’s Woodpecker
Western Wood Pewee
Western Flycatcher
American Robin
Pygmy Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
House Wren
Mountain Chickadee
Wrentit
Song Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Orange-crowned Warbler
Black-headed Grosbeak
Bullock’s Oriole
Decreasing Wild Turkey Mourning Dove
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Rock Wren
Lawrence’s Goldfinch
Western Tanager
Peaking
Anna’s Hummingbird 
Costa’s Hummingbird 
Pine Siskin
Brown Creeper
Dipping Oak Titmouse
Purple Finch
White-throated Swift
Lesser Goldfinch
Lark Sparrow
Acorn Woodpecker
Steller’s Jay
W. Scrub Jay
Spotted Towhee
Zigzag up-down-up Bushtit

Zigzag down-up-down

European Starling
No trend Turkey Vulture
Brown-headed Cowbird
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Dusky Flycatcher
Common Raven
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Band-tailed Pigeon
Warbling Vireo
American Crow
Purple Martin
Yellow Warbler

Townsend’s Warbler
Wilson’s Warbler
Too few on Cuyamaca
for trends to be compared


Cassin’s Vireo
Hermit Thrush
Common Yellowthroat
Absent

Red-breasted Nuthatch

Not bold: Species whose pattern of change in Cuyamaca (burned) did not differ significantly from their pattern on Palomar (unburned). Though these species may have responded positively (column 2) or negatively (column 3) to the fire, their variations since the fire have not been affected clearly by postfire succession.

Bold: Species whose pattern of change along in Cuyamaca (burned) differed significantly from their pattern on Palomar (unburned). Though these species may be about equally abundant in burned and unburned areas (column 1), their variations since the fire have been affected clearly by postfire succession.

Bold italic: Species whose pattern of change along the burned routes differed significantly from their pattern along the unburned routes because they were absent along the unburned routes or their numbers along the unburned routes were so low no comparison could be made.

 

Responses of Birds to the Pines Fire in the Breeding Season, April 2003–July 2007

Trend within burned area No preference
for burned or unburned
Prefers burned Prefers unburned Preference unclear
Increasing Wild Turkey
Brown-headed Cowbird
California Quail
White-throated Swift
Sage Sparrow
Greater Roadrunner
Western Wood Pewee 
Steller’s Jay
Dark-eyed Junco
Scott’s Oriole

Increased, then flat Blue-gray Gnatcatcher flat for 3 years
Red-tailed Hawk
Bullock’s Oriole
flat for 2 years
Red-shouldered Hawk
Phainopepla
flat for 4 years
Western Bluebird
White-breasted Nuthatch
Cactus Wren

flat for 3 years
Acorn Woodpecker
California Thrasher
Violet-green Swallow

flat for 2 years
Western Scrub Jay
Mountain Chickadee
Bushtit
Wrentit
flat for 3 years
Bell’s Vireo
Verdin
flat for 2 years
Increased, then decreased California Towhee
Black-headed Grosbeak 
Brewer’s Blackbird
American Kestrel
Mountain Quail
Costa’s Hummingbird 
Anna’s Hummingbird 
Loggerhead Shrike 
European Starling 
Rock Wren 
House Wren 
Lesser Goldfinch
Black-chinned Sparrow
Rufous-crowned Sparrow
Spotted Towhee
Band-tailed Pigeon 
Bewick’s Wren
Black-throated Sparrow
White-tailed Kite
Black Phoebe
House Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Yellow-breasted Chat
Western Meadowlark
Decreasing Say’s Phoebe Mourning Dove 
American Crow
N. Mockingbird

Horned Lark
Decreased, then increased
Common Raven House Finch Red-winged Blackbird
Zigzag (down-up-down) Lawrence’s Goldfinch Western Kingbird 
Lazuli Bunting
Oak Titmouse
Zigzag (up-down-up)

Hairy Woodpecker
Flat Turkey Vulture
Cooper’s Hawk
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Nuttall’s Woodpecker
Lark Sparrow
Blue Grosbeak
Ladder-backed Woodpecker
Flicker
Common Yellowthroat 
Summer Tanager
Too few for trend to be assessed

Hutton’s Vireo
American Robin
Pygmy Nuthatch

Bold: Pattern of change in burned area significantly different from that in unburned.

Bold italic: Pattern of change in burned area differs from that in unburned because numbers in unburned area too low for valid statistical comparison.

Not bold: Pattern of change in burned area not significantly different from that in unburned, or comparison not appropriate because of habitat differences (“preference unclear” category).

Responses of Birds to the Pines Fire in Winter, December 2002–February 2007 

Trend within burned area No preference
for burned or unburned
Prefers burned Prefers unburned Preference unclear
Decreasing



Increasing Cooper’s Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Mountain Quail
California Quail
European Starling
Fox Sparrow
Spotted Towhee
Wild Turkey
Greater Roadrunner
Hairy Woodpecker
American Robin
Oak Titmouse 
Wrentit 
| California Towhee
White-tailed Kite
Northern Harrier
House Sparrow
Common Yellowthroat
Peaking (number is number of winters from fire to peak) American Kestrel (4)
White-throated Swift (3)
Say’s Phoebe (4)
Loggerhead Shrike (4)
Hermit Thrush (4)
N. Mockingbird (4)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet (4)
White-crowned Sparrow (4)
Red-tailed Hawk (4)
American Crow (3)
Rock Wren (2)
Lawrence’s Goldfinch (3)
Lincoln’s Sparrow (4)
Vesper Sparrow (2)
Rufous-crowned Sparrow (4)
Phainopepla (4)
Western Bluebird (4)
Cactus Wren (4)
Bewick’s Wren (4)
Purple Finch (2)
Black-throated Sparrow (3)
Black Phoebe (4)
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (4)
Horned Lark (3)
Song Sparrow (4)
Western Meadowlark (2)
Dipping (number is number of winters from fire to trough)

Bushtit (2)
Zigzag (down-up-down; number is number of winters from fire to peak) Mountain Bluebird (4) Nuttall’s Woodpecker (4)
Common Raven (3)


Zigzag (up-down-up; number is number of winters from fire to trough) N. Flicker (4)
W. Scrub Jay (4)
Mourning Dove (3)
House Finch (3)
Dark-eyed Junco (4)
Band-tailed Pigeon (4) American Pipit
Brewer’s Blackbird
Zigzag (up-down-up-down or “M” pattern Brewer’s Sparrow House Wren
Lesser Goldfinch
Chipping Sparrow
Lark Sparrow
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Golden-crowned Sparrow Savannah Sparrow
Plateau (increase from year 1 to year 2, no change since) Sage Sparrow
Acorn Woodpecker
Steller’s Jay
California Thrasher
White-breasted Nuthatch
Red-winged Blackbird
Flat Golden Eagle
Anna’s Hummingbird

Ladder-backed Woodpecker
Mountain Chickadee
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Verdin
Absent

Pygmy Nuthatch
Scott’s Oriole

Not bold: Species whose pattern of change along the burned routes did not differ significantly from their pattern along the unburned routes. Though these species may have responded positively (column 2) or negatively (column 3) to the fire, their variations since the fire have not been affected clearly by postfire succession.

Bold: Species whose pattern of change along the burned routes differed significantly from their pattern along the unburned routes. Though these species may be about equally abundant in burned and unburned areas (column 1), their variations since the fire have been affected clearly by postfire succession.

Bold italic: Species whose pattern of change along the burned routes differed significantly from their pattern along the unburned routes because they were absent along the unburned routes or their numbers along the unburned routes were so low no comparison could be made.