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The Eyes Have It

Twenty-three species of bats are currently known from San Diego County. All San Diego County bats use echolocation to locate and capture their prey.

Bats

"Blind as a bat" may be a popular saying, but it's not true. Bats can see and may use vision for long-distance orientation.

Bats are nocturnal, which means they are active at night, dusk and dawn. Most bats use echolocation rather than vision to navigate and find prey in the dark. The bat sends out pulses of high-pitched sounds, which bounce back from surrounding objects as echoes. The bat can detect from the echoes the size, shape, and distance of things in its environment.

Some bats -- the fruit bats -- rely on vision rather than echolocation to navigate and find food. Fruit bats are found in the tropical habitats of Africa, India, and Australasia . They use sight and smell to locate their main sources of food: fruit, nectar, and pollen.


FAQs About Bats
SDNHM Field Guide: Bat

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Photo credit: Mexican Long-Tongued Bat (Choeronycteris mexicana) © John Mitchell

The Eyes Have It | Kids' Habitat

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